Beauty: How To Care For Your Nails And Get Them Looking Their Best

2 May

Nail Tips and Care Questions

How do I avoid getting polish on my cuticles?

Instead of painting right from the cuticle, place the brush on the nail bed about 1/8″ away from the cuticle and push backwards toward it, stopping just before the skin.

That’s too much work…how do remove polish from my cuticles?

Plan ahead. Paint your nails about an hour before bedtime, leaving the messy polish on. When taking a shower the next morning, the polish will soften and peel off. Any stubborn polish still left on the skin can easily be removed by rubbing it with a soft towel. Polish not dry yet? In a rush? Use a cotton swab and nail polish remover to do a quick removal.

How do I keep my polish from peeling near the skin?

Lightly buff the top of your nail near your cuticle with a fine-grained file. This will take away the top oily enamel and allow better adhesion.

My polish doesn’t peel near the skin, it peels at the tips, what am I doing wrong?

It’s usually one of these two things…

•You’ve used two or more coats of ridge-filler and followed with a couple coats of polish. To avoid peeling, stick to only one coat of ridge-filler, and wait until it’s completely dry to apply the regular polish.

•You’ve painted a couple thick coats instead of a few thin ones. Always use thin coats, it gives better coverage, dries faster and lasts longer.

I can’t apply thin coats, my nail polish is just thick to begin with. What should I do?

If you really want your nail polish to keep well in the bottle, keep it in the refrigerator, this will extend its shelf-life.

I keep getting those darn bubbles!

Two things can cut down significantly on bubbles:

ROLL the bottle between your palms, instead of shaking it. Shaking just whips bubbles into the polish. Also, use only thin coats.

Why does my polish keep cracking?

Try applying a thin clear coat of polish every other night to avoid this.

My nails keep splitting in layers at the top, will eating gelatin and drinking milk help strengthen them?

No and no. These are just myths. Your fingernails are made of keratin, the same protein as hair. Have you ever seen conditioner brag that it has calcium in it? Probably not. What WILL help strengthen your nails is to avoid filing them as much as possible, and when you have to, file in one direction only. You know what happens if you keep bending a wire back and forth? The same thing happens to nails, just on a different level. Other tips… use gloves when washing dishes and doing other household chores. Keep exposure to harsh chemicals at a minimum, especially bleach.

People say that you need different moisturizers for your nails than for your hands…why?

Well, back to the protein thing again. Would you use hand cream on your hair? Unlikely. The fact is that your fingernails absorb water 100 times faster than your skin does…and they lose the moisture just as fast as they absorb it. So considering how much hand cream you need in the wintertime, think how thirsty your nails are, and recognize that they need just as must tenderness (if not more) than your hands do.

I work with food, so my hands are constantly in water. What can I do to keep my manicure nice?

I only see two choices really.

•Keep nails well-trimmed, and don’t wear polish to work (not even clear, it’ll just crack and peel).

•Get thee to a nail salon! In my opinion, acrylic is to fingernails what Godiva is to chocolate. Only nail enhancements will stand up to the beating your hands will take.

Why won’t nails grow?

Unless you have some type of medical condition that prevents it, your nails are growing. On average, your nails grow about 1/8 of an inch per month. The reason why most people’s nails don’t seem to grow is because they break before they see results. Many people bite their nails, rip them off, others tend to shed or peel. They best way to see results is to start a healthy nail program with your nail technician.

Will artificial nails keep my nails from growing crooked?

If your nails have always grown a certain way, they will continue to grow that way until you die or something changes your nail matrix (the “brain” of the nail). Nail enhancements can only “cover” your natural nail appearance, not change it.

What can you do about ridges in nails?

Actually, nothing. If you’ve always had them, you always will. If you never had them before and just started to notice them, one reason could be stress or simply the fact that you’re getting older. As we get older the nails on our hands & toes become ridged. In order to get a

smooth polish application just GENTLY buff the nail surface with a white block buffer, remove the dust, apply a ridgefiller base coat, two coats of polish, and finally a topcoat.

How can I help my dry skin and cuticles?

Moisturize, Rehydrate, Oil, Lotion… any chance you get! Keep a good quality hand cream with you always. Whenever you wash your hands, apply it. Also, use a good quality cuticle oil and gently rub into your cuticles twice a day. For really chapped hands & feet I recommend a nice dip in paraffin wax.

Should cuticles and calluses be cut?

NO!! Never cut your cuticles or cut your calluses. These are your bodies armor. The cuticle protects the nails from infection, and the calluses give you shock absorbers . When you cut them, they will

grow back thicker and harder, and possibly create an infection. The best way to care for your cuticles is to apply a good quality cuticle oil and gently push them back with a orangewood stick. You may carefully trim any hangnails or for best results, schedule a manicure with your nail technician.

What causes finger nail damage?

The nail can be damaged by nail-biting, scratching the nail folds, bad manicuring , or trauma such as slamming a finger in a car door. Damaged nails may appear ridged or cracked and broken. If they do not appear “normal” after about one year, then most likely the nail matrix has been damaged and the nail will never be normal again.

What is Psoriasis?

Psoriasis is a hereditary disorder which most commonly affects the skin on the elbows, knees, face, and even the scalp with a rash like appearance. In the finger nails, psoriasis may appear as pits in the nail plate, or as the nail plate separating from the nail bed (onycholysis). Other symptoms include the nail loosing its normal luster, appearing discolored, or grossly thickening.

What is Paronychia?

Paronychia is an inflammation of the nail folds commonly caused by constant exposure to moisture. Exposure to bacteria or fungus can often cause a secondary infection accompanied by painful swelling of the nail fold. If the infection goes untreated for an extended period of time, the nail plate can become deformed. Paronychia can be treated by draining the infected nail fold, taking oral antibiotics, or using a topical antifungal or antiseptic lotion. If you have paronychia it’s best to avoid prolonged exposure to water (eg. washing dishes), or try wearing gloves.

What do Nails reveal about your health?

Take a look at your fingernails. Are they strong and healthy-looking? Or do you see ridges, or areas of unusual color or shape? The condition of your nails may offer clues to your general health. Illness

can cause changes in your nails that your doctor can use to develop a diagnose.

Here are a few nail disorders that may be linked with illnesses:

Beau’s lines — Indentations that run across your nail. This can appear when growth at the matrix (nail root) is disturbed by severe illness such as a heart attack, measles, or pneumonia.

Clubbing — Your fingertips widen and become round while the nails curve around your fingertips. Caused by enlargement in connective tissue as compensation for a chronic lack of oxygen. Lung disease is present in 80 percent of people who have clubbed fingers.

Half-and-Half (Lindsay’s nails) Look for an arc of brownish discoloration. May appear in a small percentage of people who have a kidney disorder.

Onycholysis (ON-i-ko-LY-sis) — The nail separates from the nail bed. Most of the time, this problem is associated with physical injury (trauma), psoriasis, drug reactions, fungal disease or contact dermatitis from using nail hardeners. Sometimes onycholysis can be related related to an over- or under-active thyroid gland, iron deficiency, or syphilis.

Spoon nails — Soft nails that look scooped out. Depression is usually large enough to hold a drop of liquid. This condition often indicates iron deficiency.

Terry’s nails — The nail looks opaque and white, but the nail tip has a dark pink to brown band. This can be a symptom of cirrhosis, congestive heart failure, adult-onset diabetes, cancer, or aging.

*Remember that the nail conditions described above are in no way deffinitive proof of a bigger health problem. Please consult with a medical professional for a realiable diagnosis.

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